Index of Questions

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  • How do I register my Company?
  • What if I can’t complete all the Vender Registration information? Can I save what I’ve done?
  • How do I find out more about doing business with the FAA?
  • What are the NAIC Codes?
  • Why do I need to provide a Security Question?
  • Is the SBO Web site Section 508 compliant?
  • How do I find out about other FAA Contracting opportunities?
  • What is the FAST Toolset?
  • How do I access the FAA Procurement Forecasts?
  • Is there an FAA Contract notification listing?
  • Who is the Small Business Development Program Group and where are they located?
  • What are NAICS Codes and how are they used in requirements?
  • Can requirements be competitively/noncompetitively awarded to socially and economically disadvantaged businesses (SEDB(8(a)) certified firms)and service-disabled veteran-owned small businesses (SDVOSB)?
  • How do procurement decisions affect small businesses?
  • How does the FAA receive credit for awards made to small businesses?
  • What is the FAA policy and guidance pertaining to coordination of requirements with the Small Business Development Program Group?
  • Are Major Procurement Program Goals (MPPG) tied to performance/strategic plans?
  • Does the FAA participate in the Historically Underutilized Business Zones (HUBZone) Empowerment Contracting Program?
  • What is contract bundling?
  • Can procurements be competitively set-aside for women-owned small businesses (WOSB)?
  • When are subcontracting plan requirements applicable?
  • What are the various types of Teaming Arrangements?
  • What is the Recertification Rule?
  • What is eFAST and how can I find information on eFAST?
  • What is eSRS?
  • When was eSRS officially launched?
  • What are Individual Subcontract Reports (ISR), Summary Subcontract Reports (SSR), and Commercial reports?
  • Should contractors be submitting ISRs for Task or Delivery Orders?
  • When are ISRs, SSRs and Commercial Reports due?
  • How can I receive eSRS training?
  • What reports do the contractors review and what does the government review?
  • What if I do not know the email address of the government or higher- tier individual who will review my reports?
  • How do I get help registering in the eSRS?
  • How does the eSRS impact my agency?
  • How can a contractor revise a report that was submitted to the government or higher-tier subcontractor?
  • Where can I find information on Lending and Bonding Assistance?
  • How do I register my Company?

    From the SBO Welcome Page, select Source-Net Small Business Database. Vendors do not need to complete their registration at one time. However, the first 5 steps must be completed before their registration will be published on the website. Vendors will be asked to provide the following information:

    • Step 1: Login Information
    • Step 2: Vendor Information
    • Step 3: NAIC codes
    • Step 4: Capability Statement
    • Step 5: Small Business Classification
    • Step 6: References (optional but once started, all information is required)

    You will receive an email notification if your company has been accepted or rejected.

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    What if I can’t complete all the Vender Registration information? Can I save what I’ve done?

    Yes. But whever possible complete steps 1 and 2 so we will have your contact information. The Small Business Office will not approve your registration for approval until you have completed steps 1 through 5.

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    How do I find out more about doing business with the FAA?

    • From the SBO Homepage, click the “Contracting” link on the left NAV Menu. This will bring you to the Federal Aviation Administration Contracting Opportunities (FAACO) Homepage.
    • Next, click on the “How to do Business with the FAA” link on the left NAV Menu.

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    What are the NAIC Codes?

    The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) was developed jointly by the U.S., Canada, and Mexico to provide new comparability in statistics about business activity across North America. Each Company must register to receive an NAICS number.

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    Why do I need to provide a Security Question?

    If you should forget your password, the security question you answer provides further privacy and identifies you specifically with your User ID.

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    Is the SBO Web site Section 508 compliant?

    Yes, the contents posted meet all FAA Web Accessibility Standards.

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    How do I find out about other FAA Contracting opportunities?

    • From the SBO Homepage, click the “Contracting” link on the left NAV Menu. This will bring you to the Federal Aviation Administration Contracting Opportunities (FAACO) Homepage.
    • Next, click the “Current Announcements” link on the left NAV Menu.

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    What is the FAST Toolset?

    FAA Acquisition System Toolset (FAST) is a One Stop Acquisition Information System.

    • FAST is the exclusive location and official record of all FAA acquisition policy vs. guidance
    • FAST is under formal Configuration Management (AMS Change Initiator Guidance)
    • FAST is updated with changes and new information quarterly. Note current version date in upper right corner of FAST Homepage.
    • FAST provides tailored policy, guidance, instructions, examples, best practices, lessons learned, references, and other related information for type of acquisition/contract.

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    How do I access the FAA Procurement Forecasts?

    • From the SBO Homepage, click the “Contracting” link on the left NAV Menu.
    • Next, click on the “Procurement Forecasts” link.

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    Is there an FAA Contract notification listing?

    • Yes. From the SBO Homepage, click the “Contracting” link on the left NAV Menu.
    • Next, click on the “FAA Contract Opportunities” link.
    • Next, click the “email subscription” link on the left NAV Menu.
    • Complete and submit the subscription form. You will receive an email for each new and updated contract opportunity.

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    Who is the Small Business Development Program Group and where are they located?

    The Small Business Development Program Group (AJA-021) develops and implements programs that assist small businesses including small business owned and controlled by socially and economically disadvantaged individuals, women-owned small businesses, and service-disabled veteran-owned small businesses to obtain procurement opportunities FAA-wide. This office provides leadership, direction, and oversight FAA-wide in establishing and executing the agency's policy and program governing the utilization of small businesses in the FAA's acquisition process.

    The Small Business Development Program Group is located at 800 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C., Room 432 - FOB 10A, (website - www.sbo.faa.gov).

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    What are NAICS Codes and how are they used in requirements?

    The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) is the standard used by Federal statistical agencies in classifying business establishments for the purpose of collecting, analyzing, and publishing statistical data related to the U.S. business economy.  This information is used to determine the size standard of all products/services procured.  The NAICS codes cover the entire field of economic activities and define industries in accordance with the composition and structure of the U.S. economy.

    The NAICS codes should be used to identify the predominate services/goods that will be procured.  The NAICS codes also assist in determining whether a company is small or large.  Each NAICS code has size standards attached to each code either based on average annual gross receipts or number of employees.

    The NAICS codes cover the entire field of economic activities and define industries in accordance with the composition and structure of the U.S. economy.

     For more information regarding the NAICS codes, visit the U.S. Census Bureau website at www.census.gov/eos/www/naics/.

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    Can requirements be competitively/noncompetitively awarded to socially and economically disadvantaged businesses (SEDB(8(a)) certified firms)and service-disabled veteran-owned small businesses (SDVOSB)?

    Yes.  A rational basis for the decision to award a noncompetitive SEDB (8(a)) or SDVOSB procurement should be documented.  Procurement decision makers should consider potential SEDB (8(a)) or SDVOSB sources of supply contained in "Source-Net" located at http://www.sbo.faa.gov/sbo or http://www.ccr.gov (click on "Dynamic Small Business Search.")   The Center for Veterans Enterprise website (http://www.vetbiz.gov/) must be reviewed to verify the SDVOSB designation prior to contract award.  The ownership and control of the sources on this website have been verified by Veterans Affairs (VA).  The public announcement requirements of AMS Section 3.2.1.3.12 are not applicable to noncompetitive awards to SEDB (8(a)) or SDVOSB firms if the product being procured is not available from Federal Prison Industries.

     Procurements may also be set-aside exclusively for competitive award among SEDBs that are expressly certified by the Small Business Administration (SBA) for participation in the SBA’s 8(a) program. Each firm claiming 8(a) status is required to provide a copy of its SBA 8(a) certification letter to the Contracting Officer (CO) as evidence of eligibility. There is no requirement to obtain the SBA's approval to make award to the selected SEDB, and procurements may be set-aside exclusively for competitive award among SDVOSB as defined by 38 U.S.C. 101. Each firm claiming SDVOSB status is required to provide a completed Business Declaration Form to self-certify its eligibility. There is no requirement to obtain the SBA’s or Veteran Administration’s approval to make award to the selected SDVOSB. However, unless the firm is designated as a SDVOSB on the VA website, the CO must not make an award to the firm as a SDVOSB. Refer to AMS Section T3.6.1.

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    How do procurement decisions affect small businesses?

    The Small Business Development Program is a business development program implemented through the procurement process. The likelihood of small businesses successfully competing is reduced if the procurement is not set-aside.  Generally, small businesses will not spend their limited bid and proposal resources to compete against large firms that have greater bid and proposal resources.  Subcontracting limits a small business visibility within the agency and subcontracting opportunities that are made available to small businesses are largely determined by the decisions made by large prime contractors.

     Set-asides “level the playing field” for small businesses to successfully compete and allows the agency to achieve its small business prime contracting goals, encourage small business participation, and provide small businesses the opportunity to grow and develop.  Set-asides allow small businesses to grow, gain exposure within the agency and obtain technically substantive work that would not otherwise be obtainable.

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    How does the FAA receive credit for awards made to small businesses?

    The agency receives credit for procurement actions awarded to small businesses that are accurately entered in PRISM and the Federal Procurement Data System.  Refer to the PRISM Users Guide generated by Acquisition and Business for more information.

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    What is the FAA policy and guidance pertaining to coordination of requirements with the Small Business Development Program Group?

    Coordination with the Small Business Development Program Group is required for all procurements estimated to be awarded in the amount of $100k or more. 

     Also, coordination is required when the estimated amount of the procurement is from $10K – $100K and the procurement will not be awarded to an SEDB 8(a) firm. 

     Forward the Small Business Set-aside Determination and Coordination Form to the Small Business Development Program Group or local Small Business Liaison Office as soon as the requirements are defined.

     The following documentation should be attached to each set-aside determination package (if applicable):

     1)      Statement of work;

    2)      Market survey/analysis;

    3)      Copy of the fully executed single source justification;

    4)      Rational basis statement;

    5)      Contract bundling memo; and

    6)      Tiered evaluation (Tiered Order of Precedence)

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    Are Major Procurement Program Goals (MPPG) tied to performance/strategic plans?

    Yes. The FAA Administrator holds the entire agency accountable to achieve all MPPGs.  Each Line of Business MPPG achievement is evaluated and color assessed (red, yellow or green) on the FAA Business Plan Builder Performance Assessment monthly report.

    Acquisition and Business (ACQ) holds itself accountable for the outcome of achieving  the goals by linking compensation decisions directly to the organization’s success in meeting its annual objectives and making progress toward the goals as described in the ACQ Business Plan.  The ACQ Business Plan Core Business Target: “Small Business Goal and Corporate Citizenship” indicates the core activities and activity targets pertaining to the Small Business Development Program.

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    Does the FAA participate in the Historically Underutilized Business Zones (HUBZone) Empowerment Contracting Program?

    No. The FAA has not established a HUBZone goal and is exempt from the SBA Goal Setting Guidelines including the establishment of HUBZone goals. 

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    What is contract bundling?

    Bundling is the consolidation of two or more requirements for supplies or services, previously provided or performed under separate smaller contracts, into a Screening Information Request (SIR) for a single contract that renders a contract likely to be unsuitable for award to a small business concern.  Bundling is discouraged unless it is necessary and justified.  The local FAA Small Business Office and the Small Business Development Program Group must be notified prior to issuance of the SIR when bundling occurs.  FAA Administrator notification and the Acquisition Executive approval is required to bundle procurements prior to SIR release. 

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    Can procurements be competitively set-aside for women-owned small businesses (WOSB)?

    WOSB set-asides shall not be implemented by FAA unless specifically authorized in the AMS.

    In December 2000, Congress created a WOSB Federal Contract Assistance Program as part of SBA’s Reauthorization Act (Public Law 106-554).  WOSB competitive set-asides are only authorized in NAICS where WOSB are underrepresented, if two or more WOSB are expected to compete and the government expects to be able to make an award at a fair and reasonable price.

    On October 7, 2010, the SBA published a final rule effective February 4, 2011, aimed at expanding federal contracting opportunities for WOSB.  The Final Rule sets forth procedures authorized by the Small Business Act to help ensure a level playing field on which WOSB can compete for Federal contracting opportunities, while helping achieve the existing statutory goal that 5 percent of Federal contracting dollars go to WOSB.

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    When are subcontracting plan requirements applicable?

    In procurements estimated to exceed $650,000 ($1.5M for construction), the Contracting Officer shall incorporate subcontracting provisions (including attainable and reasonable subcontracting goals for the participation of SB, SDB, WOSB and SDVOSB).  The subcontracting requirements are applicable to large businesses only.  Refer to AMS Section 3.6.1.2.5

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    What are the various types of Teaming Arrangements?

    AMS Guidance T3.6.1 describes the following types of teaming arrangements:

    1) Subcontracting

    -     Subcontracting plans are required for procurements over $650,000 ($1,500,000 for construction)

    -     Subcontracting goals should be attainable and reasonable

    -     Prime contractors must periodically report subcontracting awards in the eSRS reporting tool – http://www.esrs.gov

    -     Award fees may be linked to subcontracting accomplishments

    -     Subcontracting plans are not required for commercial items, when there are no subcontracting opportunities, or when the prime contractor is a small business  

    -     Include the appropriate NAICS Code in the SIR that represents the predominate area of the overall scope of work

    2) Joint Ventures

    -     Two or more business concerns may submit an offer as a small business without regard to affiliation.

    -     Exceptions to affiliation applicable to:

                - Small Business, Mentor-Protégé, 8(a), and SDVOSB

    -     SBA approved Mentor-Protégé joint ventures are not acceptable

    -     SBA approval required on all (8(a)) joint ventures

    -     Clause 3.6.1-7, “Limitations on Subcontracting” is applicable to the joint venture

    3) Mentor-Protégé

    -     Provides incentives to FAA contractors to 1) furnish technical and business assistance to SEDBs, women-owned businesses, historically black colleges and universities, and minority institutions, 2) enhance the capabilities of these firms to perform as FAA prime contractors and subcontractors, and 3) facilitate the formation of long term business relationships which benefit the FAA.  Examples of incentives include:

    -         Additional evaluation points toward the award of contracts; or

    -         Credit toward attaining subcontracting goals; or

    -         Costs incurred are allowable as direct or indirect costs; or

    -         Eligible to earn award fee; or

    -         Exclusive competition among mentor-protégé firms; or

    -         Teaming opportunities; or

    -         Long-term business relationships.

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    What is the Recertification Rule?

    The rule addresses situations where a concern was small at time of award but, over the course of the contract, has become other than small.  The purpose of the rule is to improve the accuracy of small business size status reporting, at the prime contract level, over the life of certain contracts (i.e., long-term contracts, contracts involving novations, acquisitions, and mergers).  The rule requires that a concern that represented it was a small business prior to award of a contract to represent its size status again for that existing contract (re-represent) upon the occurrence of any of the following: 

    • Short-term contracts (≤ 5 years duration):

     -         Recertification of compliance with size standards is required in the event of a merger, acquisition or novation within 30 days of the transaction becoming final. 

    • Long-term contracts (> 5 years duration): 

    -         Contracting officer must request that a business concern recertify its’ small business size status within 120 days prior to the end of the fifth year & no more than 120 days prior to exercising any option thereafter. 

    Contracting officer must update the Federal Procurement Data System to reflect the contractor’s new size status.  However, the Contracting officer is not required to terminate the contract when the concern is found to be other than small.

    Refer to AMS Clause 3.6.1-15, Post–Award Small Business Program Re-representation (January 2010).

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    What is eFAST and how can I find information on eFAST?

    eFAST is an Electronic FAA Accelerated and Simplified Tasks Multi-year Master Ordering Agreement (MOA) Program and is the FAA preferred acquisition vehicle for fulfilling agency small business goals.

     eFAST competition processes streamline new contract awards and provides direct awards to 8(a) firms, service-disabled veteran-owned businesses and Alaskan Native Corporations.  

    • -Functional Areas:

    -     Air Transportation Support

    -     Business Administration and Management

    -     Research and Development

    -     Services Engineering

    -     Computer/Information Systems Development

    -     Computer Systems Support

    -     Documentation and Training

    -     Maintenance and Repair

    -     Vera Irvin, Contracting Officer, 202-267-9191

    -     Alan Behr, Contracting Officer Technical Representative, 202-267-3213.

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    What is eSRS?

    The Electronic Subcontracting Reporting System (eSRS) is a web-based system that provides a single point of entry for federal government subcontracting requirements and reports.  This centralized database automates the business processes for completion and submission of Individual Subcontracting Reports (ISR – formally SF-294) and Summary Subcontracting Reports (SSR – formally SF-295).  The C.O. is responsible for ensuring that the contractor attains all subcontracting goals.  Subcontracting accomplishments must be timely reported in the eSRS at http://www.esrs.gov/.

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    When was eSRS officially launched?

    Its initial operating capability official launch was on October 28, 2005.  Full operating capacity was launched March 25, 2006 and the system continues to be enhanced.

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    What are Individual Subcontract Reports (ISR), Summary Subcontract Reports (SSR), and Commercial reports?

    ISR

    The ISR (formally the SF 294) collects subcontract award data for individual contracts from prime/subcontractors that: (a) hold one or more contracts over $650,000 (over $1,500,000 for construction or public facility); and (b) are required to report subcontracts awarded to Small Business (SB), Small Disadvantaged Business (SDB), Women-Owned Small Business (WOSB), HUBZone Small Business (HUBZone SB), Veteran-Owned Small Business (VOSB), and Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business concerns under a subcontracting plan.   The ISR is not required from small businesses or for commercial items for which a commercial plan has been approved, nor from large businesses in the DoD Test Program for Negotiation of Comprehensive Subcontracting Plans.

     SSR

     The SSR (formally the SF 295) collects summary subcontract award data from prime/subcontractors that: (a) hold one or more contracts over $650,000 (over $1,500,000 for construction or public facility); and (b) are required to report subcontracts awarded to Small Business (SB), Small Disadvantaged Business (SDB), Women-Owned Small Business (WOSB), HUBZone Small Business (HUBZone SB), Veteran-Owned Small Business (VOSB), and Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business concerns under a subcontracting plan.

     Commercial Reports

    Contractors with Commercial Plans (formerly known as Commercial Products Plans) are required to file only the SSR, not the ISR; moreover, they are required to file only once a year. When a contractor enters an SSR, the eSRS will prompt the user to specify whether or not the report is for a commercial plan. If the contractor indicates that this is so, the eSRS will provide a variation of the SSR specifically for contractors with a commercial plan. There are help features in the additional fields to guide the user through the report.

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    Should contractors be submitting ISRs for Task or Delivery Orders?

    The eSRS will eventually have the ability to accept ISRs for Task and Delivery Orders, but the process must first be addressed from a regulatory and policy standpoint. SBA is working with the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) and other agencies to develop a Government-wide policy. The feature will not be "turned on" until there is an official, written policy issued by either OFPP or SBA.

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    When are ISRs, SSRs and Commercial Reports due?

    ISR 

    The ISR is due semi-annually and at contract completion, always within 30 days after the close of each reporting period unless otherwise directed by the contracting officer. Normally these deadlines would be April 30th for the period ended March 31st and October 30th for the period ended September 30th. A separate report is also due within 30 days after contract completion. Reports are required when due, regardless of whether there has been any subcontracting activity since the inception of the contract or since the last reporting period.

    SSR 

    SSRs must be submitted semi-annually (for the six months ended March 31st and the twelve months ended September 30th) for contracts with DOD and NASA, and annually (for twelve months ended September 30th) for contracts with civilian agencies, except for contracts covered by an approved Commercial Plan. Reports are due 30 days after the close of each reporting period.

    Commercial Reports 

    This report is due within 30 days after the government's fiscal year.

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    How can I receive eSRS training?

    Contractors should contact their SBA Commercial Market Representative (CMR) for training. 

    -The CMR listing at http://www.sba.gov/GC/cmr.html provides the names, addresses, phone numbers, fax numbers, and email addresses of SBA's CMRs - roughly 36 people.

    Training for government officials will be provided by the eSRS Agency Coordinator – Frank Mierzejewski.  Frank can be reached via email frank.mierzejewski@faa.gov or phone: (609) 485-4384.

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    What reports do the contractors review and what does the government review?

    The Prime or higher-tier subcontractors will review their subcontractors' ISRs, and the government will review the Prime's ISR and all of the SSR.  Please note: contractors do not need to review their subcontractors' SSR.s

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    What if I do not know the email address of the government or higher- tier individual who will review my reports?

    If you are the prime contractor filing an ISR or SSR, or if you are a subcontractor filing an SSR, you should contact the Contracting Officer on the contract(s) you have with that agency and ask them for this information. If they do not understand the process, then ask to talk with their eSRS Agency Coordinator. If you cannot determine the name of that person, please send an email to the eSRS Helpdesk, and label it as a policy question asking for that agency coordinator's name. 

    If you are a subcontractor reporting to the prime contractor or a higher-tier subcontractor, we recommend that you call the person who awarded your subcontract; or, if that person is unknown, you may contact the Small Business Liaison Officer of that company.

    What if my report is still pending?  How long should it take the government to accept both my ISR and SSR? 

    Contractors need to keep in mind that once the reports are submitted to the government, they have met their reporting requirement. This does not mean that the government does not have the right to reject the report for necessary revisions. The government may reject a report at any time and ask for revisions.

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    How do I get help registering in the eSRS?

    To register in eSRS, the users should click their user type at the top of eSRS homepage, either government or contractors, and then click the Register tab on the following page.

    If you have any questions about eSRS:

    • Contractors should contact their nearest SBA Commercial Market Representative (CMR) (see list at http://www.sba.gov/GC/cmr.html).
    • Government officials should contact their eSRS Agency Coordinator.

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    How does the eSRS impact my agency?

    Contracting officers and the Offices of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBUs) will no longer receive paper SF-294s and SF-295s. Instead, they will log on to the eSRS to view their contractors' achievements. The system will provide a variety of standard reports, including Analysis of Subcontracting Plan Goal Attainment (SBA Form 1907), the DoD P-14 (after the DoD implementation), a Five-Year Trend Analysis, and a number of other reports - as well as a robust ad hoc reporting tool for users who wish to design their own reports. The agency OSDBUs will no longer need to input the SF-295 data into a Government database, as they have done in recent years, nor will they have to develop a special report for SBA. Also, the eSRS will provide automatic reminder notices to contractors when reports are due and generate delinquent notices when contractors fail to submit reports by the due date.

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    How can a contractor revise a report that was submitted to the government or higher-tier subcontractor?

    The contractor needs to contact the individual at the government or higher tier who will be reviewing their report and request it be rejected for revisions.

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    Where can I find information on Lending and Bonding Assistance?

    •         Nancy Strine, Mgr., Financial Assistance Division, U.S. DOT (S-40), (202) 366-5343

    •         DOT Short Term Lending Program

                (800) 532-1169 (Maximum line of credit is $750K)

    •         American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, Bonding Assistance Reimbursable Fee Program (www.dot.gov/recovery/ost/osdbu)

    •         National Association of Bond Producers

                (http://www.nasbp.org)

     

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    Page last modified: May 12, 2011